Jesus Never Said, “You are a Sinner”

In my previous post, we looked at the call of Peter in Luke 5:1-11. In verse 8, Peter says to Jesus: “Go away from me, Lord. I am a sinful man!” Hearing those words, it struck me: It wasn’t Jesus who said, “You are a sinner”; it was Peter who acknowledged his sinfulness.

In fact, Jesus never said “You are a sinner” to anyone.

But what about the woman who was caught committing adultery? John 8:3-11. In her case, He said: “Go now and leave your life of sin.” He had a problem with the way she was living, not with her as a person.

I was reminded of a book I read recently – “Out of a far Country”. It’s about Christopher – a former homosexual drug-dealer who became a Christian. He wrote about Leviticus 18:22 – the part in the Bible where it says: “You shall not lie with a male as with a woman. It is an abomination.” When he actually read the verse, Christopher discovered it was an abomination. He and his friends had always got the message from Christians that they were an abomination, but it wasn’t them as people God hated; it was the act of homosexuality. I’m deeply sorry that for so many years, he carried around the wrong message, and considered himself unwelcome and unloved. I think that’s why it’s so important for me and my Christian family to know what the Word of God says, and to give people the right idea of God and how He feels about them.

If you’re in a place today where you’re thinking: “Go away from me, Lord. I’m full of sin!” how about following Peter’s example? When Jesus told him not to be afraid and offered him a new life, Peter left his old life behind in favour of all that Jesus had for him.

The Thing They had to Offer

Have you ever had a moment when you were reading two books at the same time, and there seemed to be a recurring theme? This happened to me with Renee Swope’s “A Confident Heart Devotional” and Kenneth E. Bailey’s “Jesus Through Middle-Eastern Eyes” (and by the way, I would thoroughly recommend both).

Day 44 in Renee’s devotional really stuck with me because it’s written with such empathy. It’s about Jesus’ conversation with the woman at the well, who was from Samaria, and Renee calls her Sam because “it makes her feel more like the woman she really was.” In John 4:7, Jesus asked her for a drink. Renee writes: “Jesus asked Sam for the one thing she had to offer.” Coming to the well at the hottest part of the day to escape the accusations of others, she must have felt she had nothing to give, but sitting by a well, there was one thing she did have – water.

In chapter 11 of “Jesus Through Middle-Eastern Eyes”, Bailey concentrates on the call of Peter. Peter (initially known as Simon) was a fisherman, who became one of Jesus’ closest friends. In Luke 5:3, Jesus asked Simon to row a little way from shore, then He sat in the boat and taught the people. Bailey writes that Luke’s readers will know Peter ‘Owes Him one’ because Jesus had just healed his mother-in-law, but that’s not all there was to it. Jesus was requesting Peter’s help – his considerable rowing skills. Peter didn’t have anything else; he’d just fished all night and caught nothing, but he did have his boat, and the ability to row. I was instantly reminded of Sam … and the one thing she had to offer.

Have you considered that Jesus could be asking the same of you – that ‘Thing you have to offer’, whatever it might be? For me, I think one of those things is my love of words, and the desire to share what I’ve learnt with others. I don’t know what it is for you, but are you willing to use it for the glory of God?

“Bible Trivia, Jokes, and Fun Facts for Kids” Book-Review

I might have called this “The Bible Joke and Quiz Book”. In places it’s not clear whether the author’s in joke or fact mode, and I’m not sure what age-group it’s aimed at. For instance, the most memorable joke – Why did Moses have a hard time as a baby? He was in de-nial – wouldn’t be easily understood by a 5-year-old. There are certain words the author explains, such as ‘Lame’, but then he’ll use ‘Prophet’ or ‘Apostle’ with no explanation. The reference to NFL teams is also a mystery to anyone living outside of the US.

On the positive side, it’s a very good concept to have questions parents can ask their children. I’m reviewing the eBook, and I don’t think it works in this format. It would work well as a hard copy so that someone could cover up the answers.

Considering the book as a whole, there were parts I liked, particularly the section on Jesus’ disciples, but there were also some discrepancies, E.G. Troy Schmidt says King Nebuchadnezzar saw an angel in the fire with Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego; however, many Christians believe this 4th figure was not an angel, but Jesus. Schmidt also claims Psalm 119 is the longest Psalm in the Bible with 150 verses; it actually has 176.

Bethany House were kind enough to give me a complementary copy in exchange for my honest review. While I wouldn’t recommend this book in its entirety, it may hold some useful ideas for parents; they might just want to have a Bible handy to check the facts.