My Response to ‘Prosperity Preacher’ Interview

A friend on Facebook pointed me to this video. I had too much to say to just write a comment, so thought I’d blog about it instead. It’s an interview with 82-year-old Kenneth Copeland. I knew of him because he got involved with a project I used to support. He’s what Christians call a ‘Prosperity preacher’. I’ve come across so much criticism of the prosperity gospel and because I’m far from a millionaire myself, I also couldn’t see how it fitted in with Christianity.

One of the journalist’s main points seemed to be the question of why Kenneth Copeland’s ministry had private jets and he wouldn’t fly commercially. He spoke about the atmosphere on commercial flights and about alcohol. Was that the best place to be, he said, when you were about to preach to thousands? I certainly don’t believe the majority of people on a plane are drunk, but I do agree that alcohol can have a stronghold in people’s lives which is demonic. I’ve seen how it’s negatively affected people I know, and I’m sure they would live happier lives without it. If you want peace and quiet on a flight, you could put a pair of earplugs in and close your eyes; but if you can afford a private plane, and it leaves you feeling more comfortable and refreshed when you get to your destination, what’s wrong with that? He said in the interview that other ministries use the planes, not just his own, and that’s what God asks of people who are rich in this world – to be generous and willing to share. As far as I can see, he isn’t doing anything unbiblical. In fact, when he quoted the Bible, I thought he got his points across fairly well. I had never thought of Galatians 3:29 as a verse that connected Abraham’s wealth with us as Christians.

I don’t like the way he treated the journalist though. I found it annoying and quite sleazy. ‘Sweetheart’? ‘Babe’? ‘I love your eyes’? Straight onto first-name terms, and launching into prayer without asking whether she was comfortable with that? She came over as by far the most respectful of the two of them, which is very sad. I hope his wife’s had words with him about it, but are any of us flawless? Perhaps the interview helped her, as it helped me, come to a better understanding of the Biblical basis for the prosperity gospel. As I said, I’m far from a millionaire; but then, as far as I know, I haven’t been instrumental in one hundred million people coming to faith in Jesus. Maybe this is his reward for devoting his life to the cause of Christ. Jesus does talk about rewards now and in the age to come.

I may not be in a hurry to donate to Kenneth Copeland’s ministry, but shouldn’t respect and tolerance be within the church, as well as for those who aren’t church-members?

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Poor Zacchaeus

I feel a bit sorry for Zacchaeus. He was from Jericho and a tax collector in Jesus’ time. It’s a bit like being a banker in our time. We might think of bankers as these people who don’t do much and yet still receive huge bonuses, but I’m sure there are some honourable bankers.

Many in Zacchaeus’ profession would have collected taxes for the Romans and taken some extra for themselves. Maybe if people struggled to pay, they made the fines really steep, increasing them on a daily basis. That’s what most people seem to think of Zacchaeus – that he was a liar and a cheat, but …

What if Zacchaeus was an honourable tax collector?

Have you heard his story? When Jesus came to Jericho, Zacchaeus was too short to see over the crowd’s heads, so he climbed a tree. Jesus stopped at the bottom of the tree and beckoned him to come down, inviting Himself to his house. Zacchaeus gladly welcomes Him and hearing the crowd’s complaints, he stands there and says: “I will give half of my possessions to the poor. And if I have cheated anyone, I will pay back four times more” (Luke 19:8).

If I have cheated anyone.

Poor Zacchaeus. All these people, even thousands of years later, thinking he lived his pre-Jesus life as a liar and a cheat, but we don’t know for sure. We know he was wealthy (Luke 19:2), but perhaps he was wealthy simply because of the salary the Romans gave him. Either way, his encounter with Jesus filled him with generosity. How many of us would give half our possessions to the poor?

A Story That’s Stuck

I’ve been having a chat with a friend on Facebook today that ended up being about tithing. It reminded me of a story I read years ago that’s always stayed with me. I couldn’t find it anywhere online, so thought I’d blog it. I hope I’m not breaking some copyright law! It came from “Daily Walk with God” by Herman W. Gockel, and it went something like this:

A man earned £10 a week. He gladly tithed his income, giving £1 a week to the church.

He advanced up the career-ladder, gaining several promotions, until one day he turned up at his pastor’s office. “What seems to be the problem?” his pastor asked.

“Well, you see, it’s my tithing. I can no longer afford it. I now earn £10,000 a week and frankly, it’s too much!”

After a pause, the pastor looked at him and said quietly: “We could always pray and ask God to reduce your income to £10 a week.”

Makes me want to thank God for the money in my bank.

A Blessing to my Children

“The good people who live honest lives will be a blessing to their children” (Proverbs 20:7).

 

I’m on benefits because I’m blind, and I’ve never been able to find paid employment.  When I fill in forms, I’m careful to do it honestly.  On some, like the claim for Disability Living Allowance, we’re asked to say what we need, even if we don’t currently have it.  The problem is that one person’s thoughts on what they need can be very different to someone else’s.  For example, my answer to the question:  “Do you need someone to keep an eye on you?” would be no, because I can go out on my own with my cane, cross roads etc.  I’ll need help sometimes (as anybody would), but generally when I’m on my own, I’m not in danger.  But a friend of mine was advised to answer yes, because if she went out with a stain on her blouse, she wouldn’t be able to see it.

 

Although I shouldn’t judge how other people choose to answer, it does seem unfair when I see someone with the same degree of blindness or with more sight than me get significantly more money than I do, but verses like this are an encouragement to me.  I try to be a person of integrity, and this verse tells me that if I am, I’m going to be a blessing to my children (in my case, my sponsored children).

* * *

I was with someone today who’s reading Proverbs in 31 days along-with me, and she told me the verse which stuck out to her.  The verses that impact you will probably be different to mine, so if you’d like to share in the comments, that would be really exciting.

Refreshing

“The generous will prosper; those who refresh others will themselves be refreshed” (Proverbs 11:25).

 

This verse has always spurred me on towards doing good.  It’s a great reminder that when you give to others, far from losing out (as the world would have you believe), you actually gain from it.  When you refresh others, you’ll be refreshed yourself.

 

I don’t know how that refreshing will look for you, but personally, God has met my financial needs; He’s put just the right people in my life at just the times I’ve needed their encouragement …  I know I’ve mentioned Kelly before on the blog (a songwriter in the US):  We’re not in-touch so much now, but 2006 was a very difficult year, and the words to her songs a real Godsend (my favourites aren’t on YouTube, sadly).

 

Can you see God in the middle of your difficulty?  My prayer is that you’ll look back one day and see how He supported you, and if you’re going through a hard season at the moment, this is a place where you’re free to comment if you want to.  I’m happy to chat.

Don’t Put God to the Test

There’s a lot in Proverbs 3.  Today these verses made me think:  “My child, do not reject the Lord’s discipline … The Lord corrects those He loves, just as parents correct the child they delight in” (Proverbs 3:11-12), probably because I had just read Jarrod Cooper’s latest post, which talks about being correctable.  He says some people can’t handle correction, so they call it rejection … but God disciplines those He loves.  Are you accepting or rejecting God’s discipline?

 

And a verse I don’t seem to have noticed before is this one:  “Whenever you are able, do good to people who need help” (Proverbs 3:27).  I like that phrase – ‘Whenever you are able’, because it confirms what I’ve always thought:  That God doesn’t expect us to give beyond our means.  There are verses about a church who gave beyond their ability (2 Corinthians 8:1-5), but I believe that was the exception, not the rule for all of us.  Besides, if we do that with the wrong heart-motive, aren’t we in danger of putting God to the test?  “I’m giving beyond my ability; therefore You have to provide”?  Actually, God doesn’t have to do anything; He doesn’t even have to put up with us.  The things He does, He does because He loves us.  He sees us not just as people to put up with, but the apple of His eye.  Aren’t you glad?